A T O M

I'm a radio wave. Poo-tee-weet. ????? Columbus, Ohio.

#news

motherjones:

Via 350.org:

As Hurricane Sandy approaches the city, New Yorkers gathered in Times Square to send our politicians and the media a message:
End the climate silence. Connect the dots between extreme weather and climate change.


The Earth is changing. 

motherjones:

Via 350.org:

As Hurricane Sandy approaches the city, New Yorkers gathered in Times Square to send our politicians and the media a message:

End the climate silence. Connect the dots between extreme weather and climate change.

The Earth is changing. 

We are very disappointed that PBS became a political target in the Presidential debate last night. Governor Romney does not understand the value the American people place on public broadcasting and the outstanding return on investment the system delivers to our nation. We think it is important to set the record straight and let the facts speak for themselves.

The federal investment in public broadcasting equals about one one-hundredth of one percent of the federal budget. Elimination of funding would have virtually no impact on the nation’s debt. Yet the loss to the American public would be devastating.

As a stated supporter of education, Governor Romney should be a champion of public broadcasting, yet he is willing to wipe out services that reach the vast majority of Americans, including underserved audiences, such as children who cannot attend preschool and citizens living in rural areas.

For more than 40 years Big Bird, has embodied the public broadcasting mission – harnessing the power of media for the good of every citizen, regardless of where they live or their ability to pay. Our system serves as a universally accessible resource for education, history, science, arts and civil discourse.

Each day, the American public receives an enduring and daily return on investment that is heard, seen, read and experienced in public media broadcasts, apps, podcasts and online – all for the cost of about $1.35 per person per year.

Excerpts from a statement by PBS in response to a Mitthead. (via inothernews)

Yes, yes, yes. A thousand times, yes.

scinerds:

100 Million to Die by 2030 If World Fails to Act on Climate
More than 100 million people will die and global economic growth will be cut by 3.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) by 2030 if the world fails to tackle climate change, a report commissioned by 20 governments said on Wednesday.
Nina Chestney
As global average temperatures rise due to greenhouse gas emissions, the effects on the planet, such as melting ice caps, extreme weather, drought and rising sea levels, will threaten populations and livelihoods, said the report conducted by humanitarian organization DARA.
It calculated that five million deaths occur each year from air pollution, hunger and disease as a result of climate change and carbon-intensive economies, and that toll would likely rise to six million a year by 2030 if current patterns of fossil fuel use continue.
More than 90 percent of those deaths will occur in developing countries, said the report that calculated the human and economic impact of climate change on 184 countries in 2010 and 2030. It was commissioned by the Climate Vulnerable Forum, a partnership of 20 developing countries threatened by climate change.
“A combined climate-carbon crisis is estimated to claim 100 million lives between now and the end of the next decade,” the report said.
Full Article

But, like, what’s really important is that no one raises my taxes. Or eats at Chick-fil-a.

scinerds:

100 Million to Die by 2030 If World Fails to Act on Climate

More than 100 million people will die and global economic growth will be cut by 3.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) by 2030 if the world fails to tackle climate change, a report commissioned by 20 governments said on Wednesday.

Nina Chestney

As global average temperatures rise due to greenhouse gas emissions, the effects on the planet, such as melting ice caps, extreme weather, drought and rising sea levels, will threaten populations and livelihoods, said the report conducted by humanitarian organization DARA.

It calculated that five million deaths occur each year from air pollution, hunger and disease as a result of climate change and carbon-intensive economies, and that toll would likely rise to six million a year by 2030 if current patterns of fossil fuel use continue.

More than 90 percent of those deaths will occur in developing countries, said the report that calculated the human and economic impact of climate change on 184 countries in 2010 and 2030. It was commissioned by the Climate Vulnerable Forum, a partnership of 20 developing countries threatened by climate change.

“A combined climate-carbon crisis is estimated to claim 100 million lives between now and the end of the next decade,” the report said.

Full Article

But, like, what’s really important is that no one raises my taxes. Or eats at Chick-fil-a.

“Shooting can’t be—has to stop being—the language of madness and outrage and hate. Why, in this country, when an angry man reaches into his bag, is it so easy and common for his fingers to find a gun?”

Amy Davidson on the shooting Wednesday at the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C.: http://nyr.kr/SoJcvT (via newyorker)

In years to come, the summer of 2012 would be known as the Summer of the Angry White Guys with Guns.

Seriously, folks - what the fuck is going on in our country? And when will our political leaders be bold enough to swing the hammer of gun control?

We’ve Seen This Movie Before: Roger Ebert on the Aurora Shootings »

I’m not sure there is an easy link between movies and gun violence. I think the link is between the violence and the publicity. Those like James Holmes, who feel the need to arm themselves, may also feel a deep, inchoate insecurity and a need for validation. Whenever a tragedy like this takes place, it is assigned catchphrases and theme music, and the same fragmentary TV footage of the shooter is cycled again and again. Somewhere in the night, among those watching, will be another angry, aggrieved loner who is uncoiling toward action. The cinematic prototype is Travis Bickle of “Taxi Driver.” I don’t know if James Holmes cared deeply about Batman. I suspect he cared deeply about seeing himself on the news.

chasewhiteside:

futurejournalismproject:

Everyone Slow Down

With the Supreme Court ruling this morning on the Affordable Care Act, it’s important to remember Dan Gillmor’s call for a slow news movement:

Like many other people who’ve been burned by believing too quickly, I’ve learned to put almost all of what journalists call “breaking news” into the categories of gossip or, in the words of a scientist friend, “interesting if true.” That is, even though I gobble up “the latest” from a variety of sources, the closer the information is in time to the actual event, the more I assume it’s unreliable if not false…

…Rapid-fire news is about speed, which has two main purposes for the provider. The first is human competitiveness, the desire to be first. In journalism newsrooms, scoops are a coin of the realm.

The second imperative is audience. Being first draws a crowd. Crowds can be turned into influence, money or both. Witness cable news channels’ desperate hunt for “the latest” when big events are under way, even though the latest is so often the rankest garbage.

This applies not just to raw information (often wrong, remember) that’s the basis for breaking news. It’s also the case, for example, for the blogger who offers up the first sensible-sounding commentary that puts the “news” into perspective. The winners in the online commentary derby — which is just as competitive, though for lower financial stakes, as — are the quick and deft writers who tell us what it means. That they’re often basing these perspectives on lies or well-meaning falsehoods seems to matter less than being early to comment.

I’m not arguing here against human nature. We all want to know what’s going on, and the bigger the calamity the more we want to know. Nothing is going to change that, and nothing should…

…It comes down to this: The faster the news accelerates, the slower I’m inclined to believe anything I hear — and the harder I look for the coverage that pulls together the most facts with the most clarity about what’s known and what’s speculation.

Call it slow news. Call it critical thinking. Call it anything you want. Give some thought to adopting it for at least some of your media consumption, and creation.

Takeaway: Before you cheer, gnash teeth or otherwise, take some time, reflect, and find yourself reflective analysis of what’s going on. Newsrooms should do the same.

With CNN’s incorrect announcement that the individual mandate had been struck down as proof.

Last year, during his best three-month stretch, Jordan Golson sold about $750,000 worth of computers and gadgets at the Apple Store in Salem, N.H. It was a performance that might have called for a bottle of Champagne — if that were a luxury Mr. Golson could have afforded.

“I was earning $11.25 an hour,” he said. “Part of me was thinking, ‘This is great. I’m an Apple fan, the store is doing really well.’ But when you look at the amount of money the company is making and then you look at your paycheck, it’s kind of tough.”

America’s love affair with the smartphone has helped create tens of thousands of jobs at places like Best Buy and Verizon Wireless and will this year pump billions into the economy.

Within this world, the Apple Store is the undisputed king, a retail phenomenon renowned for impeccable design, deft service and spectacular revenues. Last year, the company’s 327 global stores took in more money per square foot than any other United States retailer — wireless or otherwise — and almost double that of Tiffany, which was No. 2 on the list, according to the research firm RetailSails.

Worldwide, its stores sold $16 billion in merchandise.

But most of Apple’s employees enjoyed little of that wealth. While consumers tend to think of Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., as the company’s heart and soul, a majority of its workers in the United States are not engineers or executives with hefty salaries and bonuses but rather hourly wage earners selling iPhones and MacBooks.

About 30,000 of the 43,000 Apple employees in this country work in Apple Stores, as members of the service economy, and many of them earn about $25,000 a year. They work inside the world’s fastest growing industry, for the most valuable company, run by one of the country’s most richly compensated chief executives, Tim Cook. Last year, he received stock grants, which vest over a 10-year period, that at today’s share price would be worth more than $570 million.

The New York Times, “Apple’s Retail Army, Long on Loyalty but Short on Pay.”

Apple is the greatest company in the world.

(via inothernews)

rubyvroom:

Just about the best demonstration of news “framing” I’ve ever seen.
It’s all about how you present the story. What you tell, what you don’t tell. What importance you give it. Is this the Top Story for the day? Of all the news in the world, this one you present first? Does this story get video, or just a still photo? Is there a reporter on the scene? Do the people involved get to speak for themselves? What stories come before and after it? Is this story likely to be relevant to the lives of the viewers, or is it just the most sensational/gruesome thing they could find to show you today? 
Think about what you’re seeing. Think about what happened immediately before and immediately after the video clip they show, and why they started and stopped it where they did. 
We should be giving all the kids courses in Media Literacy right now - and a lot of the adults, too.

Context and history are the two most important factors in understanding an event or series of events. Contemporary news media is sorely lacking in the presence of either. You can often trust an essay; you can never trust a tweet. A long piece of writing is the best way you can hope to learn about and come to understand anything. Read, don’t watch.

rubyvroom:

Just about the best demonstration of news “framing” I’ve ever seen.

It’s all about how you present the story. What you tell, what you don’t tell. What importance you give it. Is this the Top Story for the day? Of all the news in the world, this one you present first? Does this story get video, or just a still photo? Is there a reporter on the scene? Do the people involved get to speak for themselves? What stories come before and after it? Is this story likely to be relevant to the lives of the viewers, or is it just the most sensational/gruesome thing they could find to show you today? 

Think about what you’re seeing. Think about what happened immediately before and immediately after the video clip they show, and why they started and stopped it where they did. 

We should be giving all the kids courses in Media Literacy right now - and a lot of the adults, too.

Context and history are the two most important factors in understanding an event or series of events. Contemporary news media is sorely lacking in the presence of either. You can often trust an essay; you can never trust a tweet. A long piece of writing is the best way you can hope to learn about and come to understand anything. Read, don’t watch.

shortformblog:

Check your e-mail: Facebook may have changed it without asking
You might want to check your Timeline, and make sure that your listed email address(s) is the one you actually use. Without warning, or apparent reason outside of possibly trying to force Facebook e-mail adoption, the social networking giant altered many users’ profiles to display the Facebook e-mail address they’ve never used, which redirect to a user’s inbox and chat functionality. The company has not released any information on the change, and has yet to acknowledge what happened. Either way, now might be a good time to review the information you have posted, particularly if you run a business or want to ensure your privacy. source
Follow ShortFormBlog: Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook

Sneaksie little hobbitses

shortformblog:

You might want to check your Timeline, and make sure that your listed email address(s) is the one you actually use. Without warning, or apparent reason outside of possibly trying to force Facebook e-mail adoption, the social networking giant altered many users’ profiles to display the Facebook e-mail address they’ve never used, which redirect to a user’s inbox and chat functionality. The company has not released any information on the change, and has yet to acknowledge what happened. Either way, now might be a good time to review the information you have posted, particularly if you run a business or want to ensure your privacy. source

Follow ShortFormBlog: Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook

Sneaksie little hobbitses